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With reflection, comes insight

I don’t know about you, but this time of year tends to lend itself to reflection. Perhaps it’s the whole rush toward Christmas and the ensuing recognition that once more the mystery and meaning has been lost or, at least, short-changed. Maybe the approaching year-end is the reason with its natural beginning and end and beginning once again rotation. Whatever the reason, images and moments and people float and shimmer along my mental paths as one day turns to the next. As a writer each one becomes another opportunity to capture the intangible and, in a mad rush of optimism, begin the exploration of a new literary life in the shape and form of a story or, perhaps, an essay. We do this, I think, in the hope that we may have some revelation or glean some small whit of wisdom along the way.

As serendipity often happens, I picked up a book that opened with the following quote:

We come to terms as well as we can with our lifelong exposure to the world, and we use whatever devices we may need to survive. But eventually, of course, our knowledge depends upon the living relationship between what we see going on and ourselves. If exposure is essential, still more so is the reflection. Insight doesn’t happen often on the click of the moment like a lucky snapshot, but comes in its own time and more slowly and from nowhere but within. The sharpest recognition is surely that which is charged with sympathy as well as shock–it is a form of human vision. — Eudora Welty

So it would appear that if we are to have any insight at all, reflection is a necessary state of mind.


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  • http://barbarawklaser.mysterynovelist.com/ Barbara W. Klaser

    I find myself caught up in a reflective acceptance this time of year. Everyone tries to make the December holidays perfect, and of course they never are, so afterward we contemplate this notion of perfection and, when it isn’t achieved, what exactly we’re left with—which is pretty good if we didn’t get too caught up in the commercialism and miss the human element of the holidays.
    This time of year is both a great relief, and anticipation of the new in the coming year, even if the new is simply learning to write a different year when we date something.

  • http://barbarawklaser.mysterynovelist.com/ Barbara W. Klaser

    I find myself caught up in a reflective acceptance this time of year. Everyone tries to make the December holidays perfect, and of course they never are, so afterward we contemplate this notion of perfection and, when it isn’t achieved, what exactly we’re left with—which is pretty good if we didn’t get too caught up in the commercialism and miss the human element of the holidays.
    This time of year is both a great relief, and anticipation of the new in the coming year, even if the new is simply learning to write a different year when we date something.