Your content is here. The verification ID will NOT be detected if you put it here.

Category Archives: Writing Prompts and Exercises

Writing tension into a scene

Writing prompt to find tension in a scene
This entry is part 43 of 43 in the series Friday Sprints

This entry is part 43 of 43 in the series Friday Sprints Writing tension exercise Teasing tension out of a scene is a major task for a writer. Today’s visual writing prompt exercise involves a photograph of a happy family sitting at a picnic table. The object of the this week’s writing exercise is for…

Share

Descriptive writing – scene exercise

Atlantic_City_Boardwalk_view_north_near_Tropicana_Casino
This entry is part 18 of 43 in the series Friday Sprints

This entry is part 18 of 43 in the series Friday Sprints Descriptive writing prompt Atlantic City’s boardwalk is a great place full of sensory detail that a writer can use to make the scene come alive. This week’s visual prompt will help you exercise that part of your writer’s mind that takes in all…

Share

Writing from multiple points of view

This entry is part 42 of 43 in the series Friday Sprints

This entry is part 42 of 43 in the series Friday Sprints A point of view creative writing exercise This week’s visual prompt is a great photograph to help you exercise that storyteller’s mind. Every scene has the potential for multiple stories and differing points of view. The trick in writing a multiple viewpoint hinges…

Share

Let dialogue lead you to story

This entry is part 40 of 43 in the series Friday Sprints

This entry is part 40 of 43 in the series Friday Sprints Hear the story, set the scene Using visual prompts is a great writing exercise to warm up those creative muscles. Many writers like to add the extra A calm, even playful scene can often cast a benign overlay over darker undercurrents. This week’s…

Share

Mine a group’s dynamic for plot

This entry is part 39 of 43 in the series Friday Sprints

This entry is part 39 of 43 in the series Friday Sprints Quick scene writing exercise Groups of people provide potential story starters. We all know a group dynamic starts within minutes. Individuals take on roles and jockey for position. A group can be a terrific catalyst for a scene and start some kind of…

Share

Spin a story out of an occupation

This entry is part 38 of 43 in the series Friday Sprints

This entry is part 38 of 43 in the series Friday Sprints Use a character’s job to spark a story A person is the sum total of his or her parts and one part is that of their occupation. Uniforms or a particular style of dress often conjure up particular actions, events, and even language….

Share

Start your story in the middle of action

This entry is part 37 of 43 in the series Friday Sprints

This entry is part 37 of 43 in the series Friday Sprints Begin writing in medias res Readers today have little patience for the long, unfolding story setups of the past. They want action, demand movement. Today’s writers often take their cue from an old literary phrase that is all about beginning a story, a chapter,…

Share

Find the story in a face

This entry is part 36 of 43 in the series Friday Sprints

This entry is part 36 of 43 in the series Friday Sprints Every face is a story’s landscape The start of a story often begins when a writer sees a face. Writers are quick to notice the ever so slight droop around the eye, the nearly imperceptible bump on the nose, the swift peek of…

Share

Crack this Olympian writing exercise

This entry is part 35 of 43 in the series Friday Sprints

This entry is part 35 of 43 in the series Friday Sprints  Use your senses to unlock a story Using the senses is so important in writing that bestselling romance writer LaVryle Spencer used to have an index card naming the five senses taped to her computer. Most writers easily turn out the visual sense…

Share

Every story has a secret

This entry is part 34 of 43 in the series Friday Sprints

This entry is part 34 of 43 in the series Friday Sprints  Find a secret, unlock a story Everyone has a secret. So it’s only natural for your characters to have them, too. A good exercise to discover more about your character is to free write about his or her’s secrets. Good stories are filled…

Share

Find the action, find the story

This entry is part 33 of 43 in the series Friday Sprints

This entry is part 33 of 43 in the series Friday Sprints  Try a fast writing exercise Can’t get the creative juices flowing? Story inspiration can be found anywhere even in a work of art like a painting. Don’t wait for the muse to come to you, find a source of creative inspiration and start writing….

Share

Every photo has a story

This entry is part 32 of 43 in the series Friday Sprints

This entry is part 32 of 43 in the series Friday Sprints  Quick creative writing exercise So you’ve had a hard week and all you want to do is throw yourself onto the couch and veg in front of the TV. Sounds great but you know that won’t help you get anymore writing accomplished. What…

Share

Friday Prompt: Writing emotions

This entry is part 31 of 43 in the series Friday Sprints

This entry is part 31 of 43 in the series Friday SprintsThe 5-minute writing sprint Creative writing exercises are a great way to stoke your creativity and prod your muse. Instead of a verbal sprint, we’re using a visual one. You can use this exercise as a warm-up for more weekend writing. The exercise consists…

Share

Mid-way through the April 2012 Dewey Readathon

This entry is part 25 of 32 in the series Read-a-thon

This entry is part 25 of 32 in the series Read-a-thonSo the 24-hour Readathon is progressing and I’m still keeping up even though I had a late start. There’s been a few hiccups along the way. The ADT alarm system battery decided to wind down so I had to stop everything and figure out how…

Share

Make up a story

This entry is part 17 of 43 in the series Friday Sprints

This entry is part 17 of 43 in the series Friday SprintsTime to prime the pump with a visual prompt writing exercise. What does this photo say to you? What has happened? What will happen? What emotion does it stir? What story does it provoke? Try to have a beginning, middle and end and write…

Share